If you have pets, dogs specifically, your veterinarian has problem warned you about the high amount of ticks that we have in your area. 

There may be another tick species that we have to worry about.

I have been giving our dogs flea and tick prevention for as long as we have had them as part of the family. My black lab, Pepper, is always in the woods and tall grasses and is at a higher risk for ticks than most dogs. I try to keep up with her tick meds as often as the veterinarian suggests.

According to Metro Source News:

The longhorn tick was recently spotted for the first time in Westchester County.  The insect is common to Australia, New Zealand and eastern Asia.  It has spread to the northeast in recent years, with sightings also being reported in New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

New York has proposed a study to see what, if any, affects this breed of tick will have on pets and humans. The tick is especially worrisome because of it's ability to reproduce so rapidly.

MNN.com reports:

the tick reproduces asexually, rapidly increasing in population by cloning itself and laying thousands of eggs. The nymphs and adults also tend to "swarm" their prey, with recorded observations of hundreds of ticks hanging from their hosts like "bunches of grapes."